Research at ZSFG

 

Research

 

The research programs at ZSFG attract physicians who are committed to public health and medical advancement. At ZSFG, there are more than 20 UCSF research centers, affiliated institutes and major laboratories and more than 250 UCSF researchers whose research budget exceeds $200 million every year. These research activities support ZSFG's patient care by enabling ZSFG to attract leading physician scientists, who provide patient care as well as pursuing their research activities.

UCSF Moves Forward with Plans for New General Hospital Research Facility

ZSFG Building Would Support Longstanding Partnership, Catalyze Research Progress

By Kate Vidinsky on May 20, 2015

The newly constructed San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center will open in 2015, providing an updated place to treat the city’s population.

In addition to being the city's safety net hospital and a premier trauma center, Zuckerberg San Francisco General is home to breakthrough research by UCSF scientists.

It has been more than a decade since a baby was born HIV-positive in San Francisco.

This is no small feat, considering transmission of the disease from untreated HIV-positive mothers to their children used to occur in one of every four cases.

Thanks in large part to groundbreaking research from the unique partnership between UC San Francisco and Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (ZSFG), researchers are now focused on finding a cure for HIV, a disease that first emerged as an almost certain death sentence.

“The roots of the remarkable progress in HIV medicine over the last three decades can be traced to the partnership between UCSF and ZSFG,” said Diane Havlir, MD, a UCSF professor of medicine and chief of the HIV/AIDS Division at ZSFG. “Thanks to these efforts, we are now talking about curing HIV and aging in HIV – topics we never imagined, even a decade ago.”   Read more >>

 

"Together, UCSF and ZSFG adopt pioneering health interventions that translate research discoveries into better clinical care."